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Visiting Writers Series

Explore more information about the authors coming to KVCC.

Ada Limón

Ada Limón is the author of six books of poetry, including The Carrying, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry. Her book Bright Dead Things was nominated for the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Her work has been supported most recently by a Guggenheim Fellowship. She grew up in Sonoma, California and now lives in Lexington, Kentucky where she writes, teaches remotely, and hosts the critically-acclaimed poetry podcast, The Slowdown. Her new book of poetry, The Hurting Kind, is out now from Milkweed Editions. She is the 24th Poet Laureate of The United States.

2022 interview with Ada Limón on the Library of Congress YouTube channel (2022).  

Ada Limón reading her poem "The End of Poetry" in promotion of her book The Hurting Kind (2022).

Visit Information

Campus Visit Information

Date: Tuesday, January 24, 2023

Time: 3 p.m.

Location: Virtual event

 

Read the full announcement and view information about other upcoming speakers here.

Books

The Hurting Kind

"An astonishing collection about interconnectedness--between the human and nonhuman, ancestors and ourselves--from National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist Ada Limón"-- Provided by publisher.

The Carrying

"Vulnerable, tender, acute, these are serious poems, brave poems, exploring with honesty the ambiguous moment between the rapture of youth and the grace of acceptance. A daughter tends to aging parents. A woman struggles with infertility--"What if, instead of carrying / a child, I am supposed to carry grief?"--And a body seized by pain and vertigo as well as ecstasy. A nation convulses: "Every song of this country / has an unsung third stanza, something brutal." And still Limón shows us, as ever, the persistence of hunger, love, and joy, the dizzying fullness of our too-short lives. "Fine then, / I'll take it," she writes. "I'll take it all." In Bright Dead Things, Limón showed us a heart "giant with power, heavy with blood"--"the huge beating genius machine / that thinks, no, it knows, / it's going to come in first." In her follow-up collection, that heart is on full display--even as The Carrying continues further and deeper into the bloodstream, following the hard-won truth of what it means to live in an imperfect world."--Publisher's website.Vulnerable, tender, acute, Limón's poems explore with honesty the ambiguous moment between the rapture of youth and the grace of acceptance-- while examining the dizzying fullness of our too-short lives. -- adapted from publisher info.

Bright Dead Things

'Bright Dead Things' examines the chaos that is life, the dangerous thrill of living in a world you know you have to leave one day, and the search to find something that is ultimately disorderly, and marvelous, and ours"-- Provided by publisher.